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OMVNA Newsletter

July, 1998
Volume 10, Number 5

Lewises Leave a Legacy of Service

Reflections on a Block Party

Summer General Meeting: Old Mountain View Neighborhood Preservation

Garth Williams Joins Steering Committee as New At-Large Member

OMVNA Wants You!

Notification: Knowing What the City is Doing

Sally Lieber Honored as Outstanding Community Leader

The Old Mountain View Neighborhood is bordered by El Camino Real, Shoreline Boulevard, Evelyn Avenue, and Highway 85. The Old Mountain View Neighborhood Association consists of residents interested in preserving the quality of life in our neighborhood. Together we can make a difference—join us!


Lewises Leave a Legacy of Service

Neighbors and friends came to say goodbye to Ann, Steve, Patrick, and Michael Lewis, who are leaving the Bay Area this summer. Steve and Ann were among the original founders of our neighborhood association. In recent years, Steve served on City Council and Ann was President of the Board of Trustees for the Mountain View School District and co-chaired the successful Measure D campaign—to mention only some of the many ways in which they served our community. City Council has just presented Ann and Steve with a resolution of appreciation for their service to the community. Goodbye, we will miss you!


Reflections on a Block Party

by Maarten Korringa

On Saturday, July 11, my family and I attended the gala block party for the Lewis Family. After many years of involvement in the community, they are leaving Mountain View and their many friends to move to Fresno. (See article above).

As I looked around, it quickly occurred to me that this was not really a block party in the usual sense; rather than neighbors from the same block, most of the guests were from a bigger neighborhood—Old Mountain View.

There is a reason why people from this large area had gotten to know each other. Among the guests were the founders (the Lewises among them) and many present and past OMVNA Steering Committee members. Some speculation on what OMVNA is all about seemed to be in order.

Many people perceive OMVNA to be an activist organization. Certainly OMVNA was founded as an activist group at a time when Downtown Revitalization, a major upheaval, took place. The construction created severe noise and congestion in nearby streets. OMVNA was founded in part to raise the City’s awareness of the plight of the nearby residents, and to minimize the long-term damage to the neighborhood.

Now many years later, the downtown contruction is largely history, and things are more or less back to normal (or we are getting used to the additional traffic?). So what are we now? Tree huggers, or heaven forbid, house huggers? Promoters of Mercy-Bush Park? Opponents of development? Probably guilty as charged, on all counts. OMVNA is a collection of neighbors, and these are just a few of the causes some neighbors are committed to.

But that is not what OMVNA is. Rather, we are an organization for keeping neighbors in touch with other neighbors and with the City. We do this by holding monthly meetings, by hosting general meetings three times a year, and by fostering relationships with City Hall. And above all, the OMVNA newsletter is the glue keeps our neighborhood connected.

If neighborhood connection is important to you, consider joining us. Volunteer as a newsletter carrier, attend one of the monthly meetings, or check out our web site at http://www.omvna.org If you live in Old Mountain View you’re already a member—your participation is welcome!


Summer General Meeting: Old Mountain View Neighborhood Preservation

Attend an informative and entertaining event on neighborhood preservation in Old Mountain View. A panel discussion will focus on the OMV Neighborhood Preservation Plan and the history and current development of OMV. Come with your questions regarding preservation and development in OMV! Refreshments will be served.

Date: Wednesday, August 5, 1998

Time: 7:00-8:45 P.M.

Location: Community Room, Mountain View Public Library


Garth Williams Joins Steering Committee as New At-Large Member

Welcome to Portland native Garth Williams who recently joined the OMVNA steering committee as the newest “at large” member. Garth has degrees in electrical engineering and business administration, and recently opened an office of Investment Management & Research in the Mountain Bay Plaza (Bank of America building) on Castro Street, a mere two blocks from his new home at The Accolades. His wife, Hawaii native Pamela Aratani, is a Marketing Engineer at TeraLogic Inc., also in downtown Mountain View. They recently adopted a baby girl, Charlotte, from China. When not working or playing with their baby daughter, Garth enjoys running, basketball, golf, wine tasting and serving on the OMVNA Steering Committee!


OMVNA Wants You!

New to the neighborhood and want to get involved? We are looking for interested people to serve on the OMVNA Steering Committee for 1998-99. You can choose your own time commitment and degree of involvement.

A new slate of candidates will be voted upon at a general meeting in October. If you are interested in serving, know a neighbor who might be, or just want some more information, call Maarten Korringa at 969-7678 or e-mail him at mkorringa@aol.com.


Notification: Knowing What the City is Doing

by Ronit Bryant

In February, City Council approved the extension of the Stevens Creek Trail from Landels School and Park to Yuba Drive. When work is completed, the trail will connect our neighbor-hood to Shoreline Park. While the passage of the trail through our neighborhood has not been controversial, some neighbors whose properties are adjacent to the trail have said they were not aware of the trail plan or of the fact that it was being discussed this year at both the Parks & Recreation Commission and at City Hall. The City insists that all neighbors who will be directly impacted were noticed.

The issue of notification, of informing residents that an issue in which they are interested is going to be discussed in front of City Council or a City board, committee, or commission, is one that arises again and again. Were the neighbors given notice? Were they all given notice? Faulty notification has in the past been known to disqualify the results of weeks and even months of work.

Linda Forsberg, Deputy City Manager, says that City staff has instructions to err on the side of over-noticing. The City can, and has, used different means of notifying residents: ads in local papers, letters or postcards to residents; notices on the City's web page (http://www.ci.mtnview.ca.us); notices posted at specific locations to be discussed or throughout a neighborhood; information sent to neighborhood associations; door-to-door hand delivery of messages; and others.

But still residents complain that they had no idea a subject about which they have strong feelings was going to be discussed. Do we all get too much junk mail to pay attention to what is of real interest to us? What would work for you? Let us know, and we'll pass your answers on to the City.


Sally Lieber Honored as Outstanding Community Leader

We have a celebrity in our midst! Sally Lieber, Vice President of the OMVNA, was recently honored as Outstanding Community Leader for 1998 by the Mtn. View Chamber of Commerce and The Voice. Writes Vonya Sloan who authored Sally’s award-winning nomination: “Sally has given hundreds of hours of service to enhance the education of young people. This past year, as a member of the 1998 Leadership Mountain View class, Sally was instrumental in creating the class’ mentoring project at Alta Vista High School. Class members, along with community members - volunteers from The Voice, City staff and corporations - were recruited to mentor students at the high school. The mentors used those connections to help students experience the work place, talk about career development, visit local colleges, and in general, expose them to new possibilities.

Sally has been a tutor with the Mtn. View/Los Altos Adult Education’s Project ABLE program. Last year, she created the “Community Caring” scholarship for adult education, to recognize a graduating student whose service to the community might have gone unrecognized.

Congratulations Sally!


The Old Mountain View Neighborhood Association Newsletter
is published by a volunteer editorial committee & distributed to some 1900 homes and businesses by volunteers.

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The opinions printed in this newsletter are not necessarily those of the OMVNA Steering Committee.